Presence to Influence: Examining the Politics of Representation in Global Environmental Governance

By: Kimberly Marion Suiseeya (Department of Political Science, Northwestern University)[1] Laura Zanotti (Department of Anthropology and Center for the Environment, Purdue University)[2] Kate Haapala (Department of Political Science, Purdue University) Sarah Huang (Department of Anthropology and Ecological Sciences and Engineering, Purdue University) Savannah Schulze (Department of Anthropology, Purdue University) Kate Yeater (Department of Anthropology, Purdue … More Presence to Influence: Examining the Politics of Representation in Global Environmental Governance

Call for Posts: Toxic Bodies

Epigenetics, developmental biology, and feminist science and technology studies teach us that organisms are not merely affected by their environment—they are co-constituted by it, in deep dialogue. What, then, does it mean to be human in the abundant presence of human-produced toxins? From Bisphenol A (BPA) to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to glyphosate and many more, … More Call for Posts: Toxic Bodies

Commentary: The Environmental Anthropology of Settler Colonialism, Part II

*A commentary on Part II of our Engagement thematic series, Life on the Frontier. By Clint Carroll, University of Colorado Boulder § Settler colonial studies offers a set of analytical tools that can help make sense of environmental practices and politics—and their resulting effects on people, other-than-human animals, and landscapes. Understanding the environmental impacts of settler colonialism, … More Commentary: The Environmental Anthropology of Settler Colonialism, Part II

Commentary: The Environmental Anthropology of Settler Colonialism, Part I

*A commentary on Part I of our Engagement thematic series, Life on the Frontier. By Zoe Todd, Carleton University § If we take seriously the work of Indigenous scholars on the Indigenous legal-governance systems of territories across what is now Canada, and if we pay close attention to the ways that Indigenous legal orders and traditions … More Commentary: The Environmental Anthropology of Settler Colonialism, Part I

Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

By Paul Berne Burow, Yale University § On May 3, 1933, a common brown buffalo cow gave birth to a snow-white bison calf on the National Bison Range near Moiese, Montana. A ranger noticed it during his morning rounds, and news spread rapidly. A sense of hope swept through communities of the Flathead Nation in western Montana. … More Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

Reclaiming Nature? Indigenous Homeland and Oil Sands Territory

By Tara Joly, University of Aberdeen § Settler colonial relations construct the Athabasca region as extractive oil sands territory, yet the region remains homeland for Indigenous peoples, including Métis individuals. In my doctoral research, I argue that oil sands reclamation – the process of cleaning up extractive spaces by returning the land to a “productive” or … More Reclaiming Nature? Indigenous Homeland and Oil Sands Territory

Mild Apocalypse – Feral Landscapes in Denmark: Reflections on an Exhibition

By Nathalia S. Brichet, Frida Hastrup, and Felix Riede § From the late 1930s until 1970, low-grade brown coal was extracted at Søby in mainland Denmark. This activity carried out largely by manual labour massively transformed, if not destroyed, the surrounding landscape. The need for Danish brown coal extraction was spurred by increasing domestic demand, but even more … More Mild Apocalypse – Feral Landscapes in Denmark: Reflections on an Exhibition