Rhythms of Resistance on Timorese Saltscapes

Editorial Note: This post is part of our series highlighting the work of the Anthropology and Environment Society’s 2018 Roy A. Rappaport Prize Finalists. We asked them to outline the argument they made in their submission and to situate their work in relation to the field of environmental anthropology. By Gillian Bogart, University of California, […]

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The Time Travelers: Ambiguous Returns

By Elaine Gan, New York University §  H. G. Wells’ 1895 novel introduced us to a modernist conception of a time machine, a humanmade device that renders time as place, a mode of transport that shuttles back and forth along a fourth dimension that sequences past, present, and future. Wells’ lone time traveler, a man […]

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Call for Posts: Ecological Times

Ecological processes unfold in unstable coordination. The phenology of a species might come into alignment with the seasonal availability of a food source, say, but disturbance, shifting environmental conditions, and system feedbacks mean that these alignments are always tentative—even in the most tightly coupled, bounded ecosystems. Somewhere between machinic and haphazard, ecosystems are at once […]

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The Meanings and Limits of “Local Water” in Los Angeles

By Sayd Randle, University of Southern California § In the fall of 2014, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti held a press conference in front of the L.A. Department of Water and Power’s (DWP) downtown headquarters to sign his Executive Directive #5, titled “Emergency Drought Response – Creating a Water Wise City.” ED5, as everyone called the […]

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The Sacrifice Zones of American “Energy Independence”: Pipeline and Refinery Expansion in the Chicago Region

By Graham Pickren, Roosevelt University § The United States is seemingly on its way to “energy independence.” Since the oil price increases and gas lines of the 1970s shocked the sensibilities of an American population blissfully unaware of the inter-dependencies that structured their everyday lives, both Democratic and Republican regimes have aggressively pursued domestic energy production […]

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Fates of Forests in Borneo: A 40-Year Retrospective

By F. E. “Jack” Putz, University of Florida § After barreling through rural Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo) for several hours in a double-cabbed pick-up I was grateful when a bed-rider tapped on the roof to signal the driver to stop. My butt was sore and I needed to pee. The recently paved road allowed spurts of high-speed […]

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