Exceptional Geologies as Models for Life in Oklahoma’s “Fracking-Scenes”

Editorial Note: This post is part of our series highlighting the work of the Anthropology and Environment Society’s 2019 Roy A. Rappaport Prize Finalists. We asked them to outline the argument they made in their submission and to situate their work in relation to the field of environmental anthropology. By Lara Rodriguez, George Washington University § […]

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Scandal, Blame, and the Politics of Contamination in Peru’s Quinoa Bust

Editorial Note: This post is part of our series highlighting the work of the Anthropology and Environment Society’s 2019 Roy A. Rappaport Prize Finalists. We asked them to outline the argument they made in their submission and to situate their work in relation to the field of environmental anthropology. By Emma McDonell, University of Tennessee at […]

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The Epistemology of Cutting and the Metaphysics of Continuities

By Meredith Root-Bernstein, Musée de l’Homme, Paris, France; Center of Sustainability and Applied Ecology, Santiago, Chile; Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity, Santiago, Chile §   Confinement Project Just before coronavirus made intra-European travel impossible, I took the train to London where I met up with the artist Anna Ridler at a pub and later went to […]

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Earth Displacements: Draining the Swamp in Southeast Sulawesi

Editorial Note: This post is part of our series highlighting the work of the Anthropology and Environment Society’s 2019 Roy A. Rappaport Prize Finalists. We asked them to outline the argument they made in their submission and to situate their work in relation to the field of environmental anthropology. By Joe Klein, University of California at […]

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Cattle, Fracking, and the Problem of Latent Control in American Settler Ecology

By Néstor L. Silva, Stanford University § In May of 2017, I visited a frack site along with a group of petroleum engineering students from the University of North Dakota. Before being allowed to go, we went through a two-day training mandated by the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), followed by a few […]

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Horizons, Not Curves: Creating Space for Radical Care in a Pandemic

By Randall Burson II and Angela Ross Perfetti § “If you have an R0 of 2 — two more cases on average for every person infected — the math tells you that if it is not impeded in any way, that fire burns through the forest, and in the end it will have burned half […]

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Destination Anthropocene: An Interview with Amelia Moore

Destination Anthropocene: Science and Tourism in The Bahamas By Amelia Moore, University of Rhode Island 216pp. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press § Colin Hoag spoke with Prof. Amelia Moore about her recent book on science and tourism in The Bahamas.     Thanks for writing this wonderful book. For Engagement readers who have not […]

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The Vanishing Land: In Search of a Myth for Samothraki

By Eleni Kotsira, University of St Andrews § It is an evening in the early days of August 2019. I am sitting at a café in an alleyway popular with tourists in the village of Chóra, on Samothraki, the northernmost island of Greece. My ears buzz with ethereal sounds of music, tourist chit-chat, photo clicks. […]

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Have Some Mental Health: The Black Summer Bushfires, COVID-19, and the Governance of Psychic Retreat

By Aaron Neiman, Stanford University § Introduction: Hard to Process The events of the recent past have felt increasingly difficult to process. It is a sentiment that one hears more often now, as the events themselves seemingly accelerate in their frequency, their complexity, and their tragicomic absurdity. Inured to mass shootings and powerless to the […]

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Call for Posts: The Event, the Horizon

Perhaps something has occurred in the history of the concept of structure that could be called an “event.” (Derrida 1978: 278) Circumstances are extraordinary. Days are like weeks. Spring arrives, but the streets are empty. An abundance of caution overwhelms all plans. We reach out in darkness for a wall to walk along. The problem […]

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