Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

Paul Berne Burow, Yale University § On May 3, 1933, a common brown buffalo cow gave birth to a snow-white bison calf on the National Bison Range near Moiese, Montana. A ranger noticed it during his morning rounds, and news spread rapidly. A sense of hope swept through communities of the Flathead Nation in western Montana. … More Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

Mild Apocalypse – Feral Landscapes in Denmark: Reflections on an Exhibition

By Nathalia S. Brichet, Frida Hastrup, and Felix Riede § From the late 1930s until 1970, low-grade brown coal was extracted at Søby in mainland Denmark. This activity carried out largely by manual labour massively transformed, if not destroyed, the surrounding landscape. The need for Danish brown coal extraction was spurred by increasing domestic demand, but even more … More Mild Apocalypse – Feral Landscapes in Denmark: Reflections on an Exhibition

Of Territorialization and Transplantation: The Contradictions of a Settler Garden in South Africa

Derick Fay, UC Riverside Department of Anthropology § Located in what is now the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, the Haven Hotel is nested within concentric circles of settler demarcation. With changes in South African society, the projects represented by these demarcations have shifted over time. The hotel occupies a space historically designated for white … More Of Territorialization and Transplantation: The Contradictions of a Settler Garden in South Africa

Concrete and Livability in Occupied Palestine

By Kali Rubaii, University of California, Santa Cruz § Portland Cement extracts the enduring time of rocks and mobilizes it to build quickly. Through heat, rock[1] is bound with metals and synthetic chemicals– calcium, silica, aluminum, fly ash, lime. Mixed with water, it becomes concrete and clings to fingers, shovels, jeans. It is rock, transformed into … More Concrete and Livability in Occupied Palestine

Infrastructure – Peripheral Visions and Bodies that Matter: A Commentary

*A commentary on Part II of our Engagement thematic series, The Nature of Infrastructure. By Bettina Stoetzer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology § In the past few years, the keyword “infrastructure” has proliferated within anthropological literature. Many ethnographies have taken a close look at the ways in which physical networks, such as roads, canals, trains, sewage … More Infrastructure – Peripheral Visions and Bodies that Matter: A Commentary

Cultivating the Nile: An Interview with Jessica Barnes

Cultivating the Nile: The Everyday Politics of Water in Egypt By Jessica Barnes 248pp. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. § Colin Hoag (UC Santa Cruz and Aarhus University) spoke with Prof. Jessica Barnes about her recent book on the culture and politics of water management in Egypt.     For Engagement readers who have not … More Cultivating the Nile: An Interview with Jessica Barnes

Call for Posts: Life on the Frontier: The Environmental Anthropology of Settler Colonialism

This thematic series poses the question: What kinds of nature are forged through settler colonialism? A distinct form of colonization, settler colonialisms do not merely conquer people and territory—they seek to transplant and redefine. The desires, fears, messianism, violence, masculinity, sexuality, and racism that characterize settler colonialism shape how colonists imagine and interact with the … More Call for Posts: Life on the Frontier: The Environmental Anthropology of Settler Colonialism