“Radical Bricoleurs”: On Doing Science, Community Life, Activism and Bureaucracy in Mozambique

By Anselmo Matusse, University of Cape Town § One day I was walking with Mr. Angelo, 69 years old, a former Renamo soldier, demobilized in 1994, who is now a farmer and a hunter towards his rice farm in Nvava, which is located in the lands of former colonial tea plantations called Cha Tacuane in Nvava, … More “Radical Bricoleurs”: On Doing Science, Community Life, Activism and Bureaucracy in Mozambique

The Sacrifice Zones of American “Energy Independence”: Pipeline and Refinery Expansion in the Chicago Region

By Graham Pickren, Roosevelt University § The United States is seemingly on its way to “energy independence.” Since the oil price increases and gas lines of the 1970s shocked the sensibilities of an American population blissfully unaware of the inter-dependencies that structured their everyday lives, both Democratic and Republican regimes have aggressively pursued domestic energy production … More The Sacrifice Zones of American “Energy Independence”: Pipeline and Refinery Expansion in the Chicago Region

Hurricane Bomb

By Rosa E. Ficek, University of Puerto Rico at Cayey § Nobody went outside. The outside world did not exist. There was no internet or television. The power had gone out the night before, the cell phone signal early that morning. Only the radio with the one AM station that had managed to stay on air. That … More Hurricane Bomb

Poetry in the Anthropocene

By Autumn Sharp, University of Kent § I’ll only ask questions I don’t want to know the answers to “Jupiter’s gravity slings long-period comets out of harm’s way, while nudging some asteroids closer to Earth. And, in 1770, Jupiter took aim on Earth – but missed.”     –Deborah Byrd for EarthSky, Nov 25, 2015 1 There is … More Poetry in the Anthropocene

University of Memphis and the Sierra Club Team up to Promote Education, Advocacy & Activism at Grassroots Environmental Conference

By Kathryn Hicks, Rita Harris, Keri Brondo and Robert Marczynski § Memphis is a highly segregated Southern city with a long history of both environmental inequality and of environmental justice (EJ) organizing. A valuable resource for the city and region is the grassroots environmental conference that annually brings together academics and community organizers. Designed for … More University of Memphis and the Sierra Club Team up to Promote Education, Advocacy & Activism at Grassroots Environmental Conference

Water in Lesotho: Contradiction, Disjuncture, Death

By Colin Hoag § There is a language we use to talk about water, and it is filled to overflowing with clichés: fluidity, movement, connection, life-itself. Thinking through water in the mountainous enclave-state of Lesotho gives the lie to our familiar metaphors. It raises the question: What if instead of moving, connecting, and sustaining, water … More Water in Lesotho: Contradiction, Disjuncture, Death

The Highway Re-Route Movement of Trinidad and Tobago: From Dependency to Democracy

By Ryan Cecil Jobson § As of Sunday, Dr. Wayne Kublalsingh has ingested neither food nor water for forty days, accepting only two bags of medical drips during a brief hospital stay earlier this month. Only two years ago, Kublalsingh ended a previous hunger strike after three weeks, when Trinidad and Tobago Prime Minister Kamla … More The Highway Re-Route Movement of Trinidad and Tobago: From Dependency to Democracy