Mild Apocalypse – Feral Landscapes in Denmark: Reflections on an Exhibition

By Nathalia S. Brichet, Frida Hastrup, and Felix Riede § From the late 1930s until 1970, low-grade brown coal was extracted at Søby in mainland Denmark. This activity carried out largely by manual labour massively transformed, if not destroyed, the surrounding landscape. The need for Danish brown coal extraction was spurred by increasing domestic demand, but even more … More Mild Apocalypse – Feral Landscapes in Denmark: Reflections on an Exhibition

Museums and Ecology: The Story of “Little Frog” (Ranunculus paucifolius)

By Joanna Cobley, University of Canterbury § One botanical specimen collected in the late nineteenth century provides the starting point for this commentary on “museums and ecology.” What can this small endemic buttercup on the verge of extinction that lives on a limestone slope at an altitude of 760 meters tell us about human-environment relationships, preservation … More Museums and Ecology: The Story of “Little Frog” (Ranunculus paucifolius)

Open Call for Posts: Museums and Ecology

Museums are important spaces where scholarly research has the opportunity to reach broader audiences beyond academia. These spaces can be especially significant in communicating research on pressing ecological issues to the public. In this thematic series, we ask, what can museums, including their exhibitions and collections, tell us about human-environment engagements? Additionally, how do studies … More Open Call for Posts: Museums and Ecology