Presence to Influence: Examining the Politics of Representation in Global Environmental Governance

By: Kimberly Marion Suiseeya (Department of Political Science, Northwestern University)[1] Laura Zanotti (Department of Anthropology and Center for the Environment, Purdue University)[2] Kate Haapala (Department of Political Science, Purdue University) Sarah Huang (Department of Anthropology and Ecological Sciences and Engineering, Purdue University) Savannah Schulze (Department of Anthropology, Purdue University) Kate Yeater (Department of Anthropology, Purdue … More Presence to Influence: Examining the Politics of Representation in Global Environmental Governance

Reclaiming Nature? Indigenous Homeland and Oil Sands Territory

By Tara Joly, University of Aberdeen § Settler colonial relations construct the Athabasca region as extractive oil sands territory, yet the region remains homeland for Indigenous peoples, including Métis individuals. In my doctoral research, I argue that oil sands reclamation – the process of cleaning up extractive spaces by returning the land to a “productive” or … More Reclaiming Nature? Indigenous Homeland and Oil Sands Territory

Anthropology and Environment Society at the 2016 AAA Meeting

Anthropology and Environment Society Panels and Events at AAA 2016 INVITED SESSIONS Friday, November 18, 2016 10:15 – 12:00 pm UNCOMMON TERRITORIES OF THE ‘COMMON GOOD’ (Oral session co-invited with Society for Cultural Anthropology) 1:45 – 3:30 pm MURKY MARGINALITY: UNCERTAINTY, LIMINALITY, AND LONG-TERM CYCLES IN CONSERVATION (Roundtable co-invited with Association for Africanist Anthropology) 4:00 … More Anthropology and Environment Society at the 2016 AAA Meeting

Settler Colonialism and Weed Ecology

By Timothy Neale, Deakin University § *All photographs are by the author Two propositions to start: there is a significant parallel (or companionship) between settlers and weeds; and, there is also a significant parallel (or companionship) between the structures of settler colonialism and those of weed ecology. These are the propositions that I want to work through … More Settler Colonialism and Weed Ecology

Harvesting Ruins: The Im/Permanence of Work Camps and Reclaiming Colonized Landscapes in the Northern Alberta Oil Sands

By Janelle Marie Baker, Anthropology McGill University § *All photos taken by Janelle Marie Baker My Nehiwayak (Cree) friends who have the patience and kindness to take me out to the “bush” or Canadian subarctic boreal forest often ask me to film and photograph their activities, but on this particular summer day I am careful to not … More Harvesting Ruins: The Im/Permanence of Work Camps and Reclaiming Colonized Landscapes in the Northern Alberta Oil Sands

Concrete and Livability in Occupied Palestine

By Kali Rubaii, University of California, Santa Cruz § Portland Cement extracts the enduring time of rocks and mobilizes it to build quickly. Through heat, rock[1] is bound with metals and synthetic chemicals– calcium, silica, aluminum, fly ash, lime. Mixed with water, it becomes concrete and clings to fingers, shovels, jeans. It is rock, transformed into … More Concrete and Livability in Occupied Palestine