Commentary: Toxic Bodies, Part II

By Kristina Lyons, University of California, Santa Cruz § The president of the communal action committee whom I call Doña Marta ushered me to a more secluded corner behind the schoolhouse. She spoke in a low tone about the worsening water quality of the river flowing behind us. Over the last four years, downstream communities in […]

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Concrete and Livability in Occupied Palestine

By Kali Rubaii, University of California, Santa Cruz § Portland Cement extracts the enduring time of rocks and mobilizes it to build quickly. Through heat, rock[1] is bound with metals and synthetic chemicals– calcium, silica, aluminum, fly ash, lime. Mixed with water, it becomes concrete and clings to fingers, shovels, jeans. It is rock, transformed into […]

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An “Ecological Path” in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park: On the Reflexivity of Oil Infrastructure

By Peter Taber, University of Arizona § Yasuní National Park is Ecuador’s largest Amazonian protected area, one of the most biodiverse places in the world, and the site of multiple waves of oil development since the late 1980s. Since August 2013, contentious plans for drilling in the eastern-most portion of the park have moved forward. […]

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On Rust

By Stephanie McCallum, University of California, Santa Cruz § Recent scholarship in anthropology has addressed infrastructure not in its fully functioning capabilities, but as it falls apart (e.g. Chu 2014). In a similar vein, here I attend to rust as a manifestation of infrastructural deterioration. Based on 13 months of ethnographic fieldwork (September 2013 – October 2014) […]

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Tactics of Power and Empowerment in Knowledge-Making Infrastructures

By Kirk Jalbert, Manager of Community Based Research & Engagement, FracTracker Alliance and Visiting Research Professor, Center for Science, Technology and Society, Drexel University § Energy extraction has become a topic of contentious debate due to the use of unconventional drilling practices known as hydraulic fracturing—often referred to as “fracking”—to retrieve oil and gas from shale bed formations. Along […]

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The Limpkin: A Poem and Short Essay

By Zachary Caple, University of California, Santa Cruz § The Limpkin Lover of the trashiest shorelines, the limpkin is an ibis made plainer, browner. Flecked white collar and long proboscis, it makes a living along the dock-stamped littorals and dingy canals of Florida. I got my first good look at a limpkin in a phosphate […]

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