Building Out the Rat: Animal Intimacies and Prophylactic Settlement in 1920s South Africa

By Branwyn Polykett, University of Cambridge § In the years between the two world wars another global war was declared, the war on the rat. The rat was a stray organic glitch in the logistics of imperial modernity, insinuating itself onto ships, transmitting infectious disease along trade routes, displacing local rodents, disrupting local ecologies and destroying crops … More Building Out the Rat: Animal Intimacies and Prophylactic Settlement in 1920s South Africa

An “Ecological Path” in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park: On the Reflexivity of Oil Infrastructure

By Peter Taber, University of Arizona § Satellite imagery of a small section of the Block 31 road entering the Apaika platform area, taken in 2013. Imagery courtesy of Matt Finer (Amazon Conservation Association), Massimo De Marchi (DICEA, University of Padova), Francesco Ferrarese (DiSSGea, University of Padova) and Salvatore Eugenio Pappalardo (DAFNAE, University of Padova) … More An “Ecological Path” in Ecuador’s Yasuní National Park: On the Reflexivity of Oil Infrastructure

Cloaking, Not Bleaching: The Back Story from Inside Bureaucracy

By Janis Bristol Alcorn § “… In other words, the way that bureaucracies work is by bleaching out local context and coming up with big simplifications.”   – Andrew Mathews, as quoted in his January 2013 interview with ENGAGEMENT I would counter by positing that good bureaucracies do not bleach out local context. Instead, they create … More Cloaking, Not Bleaching: The Back Story from Inside Bureaucracy

Andrew Mathews on Forestry, Bureaucracy, and Engaged Scholarship

ENGAGEMENT editor Rebecca Garvoille recently caught up with Andrew S. Mathews, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, to discuss his recent book, Instituting Nature: Authority, Expertise, and Power in Mexican Forests (2011, MIT Press), and its broader contributions to forest policy and socio-environmental justice debates in Mexico. This interview is the third installment … More Andrew Mathews on Forestry, Bureaucracy, and Engaged Scholarship