Confessions of a Reluctant Climate Project Collaborator

By Micha Rahder, Louisiana State University § Let me start with a confession: I never wanted to work on climate change. Don’t get me wrong – I am no climate change denier. But following my academic passions – first ecological and later anthropological – has historically led me to the lively entanglements of forests, not … More Confessions of a Reluctant Climate Project Collaborator

Loving, Eating, Teaching, and Wayfaring in the Anthropocene

By Trevor Durbin, Kansas State University § “I took this class because I wanted to address my relationship with the idea of climate change. I think I was somewhere between guilt and grief…” I read these opening lines of a student essay with a sinking in the pit of my stomach. It was written by … More Loving, Eating, Teaching, and Wayfaring in the Anthropocene

Teaching (and Doing) Climate Change Activism

By Bradley B. Walters, Mount Allison University, Canada § I teach at a relatively small, primarily undergraduate liberal arts and sciences university in Atlantic Canada. Bucking academic trends elsewhere, we actively cultivate interdisciplinary learning, and students are encouraged to pursue extra-curricular experiences. We are a public institution, but top-ranked and so recruit many first-rate students from across … More Teaching (and Doing) Climate Change Activism

Open Call for Posts: Anthropology and Climate Change: Intersections of Teaching, Interdisciplinary Research, and Activism

The recent conversation on the EANTH listserv surrounding Naomi Klein’s book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate brought to light important differences regarding how anthropologists engage with and teach the subject of climate change. We invite contributors to submit posts that focus on the intersection of teaching about climate change, interdisciplinary research, and environmental … More Open Call for Posts: Anthropology and Climate Change: Intersections of Teaching, Interdisciplinary Research, and Activism