Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

Paul Berne Burow, Yale University § On May 3, 1933, a common brown buffalo cow gave birth to a snow-white bison calf on the National Bison Range near Moiese, Montana. A ranger noticed it during his morning rounds, and news spread rapidly. A sense of hope swept through communities of the Flathead Nation in western Montana. … More Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

Reclaiming Nature? Indigenous Homeland and Oil Sands Territory

Tara Joly, University of Aberdeen § Settler colonial relations construct the Athabasca region as extractive oil sands territory, yet the region remains homeland for Indigenous peoples, including Métis individuals. In my doctoral research, I argue that oil sands reclamation – the process of cleaning up extractive spaces by returning the land to a “productive” or … More Reclaiming Nature? Indigenous Homeland and Oil Sands Territory

Living with the Environmental and Social Legacy of U.S. Land Policy in the American West

By Julie Brugger, University of Arizona § Looking out across the arid, mesquite- and saguaro-studded landscape of the Tonto Basin District of the Tonto National Forest (TNF) in central Arizona, it is not apparent to the untrained eye that there is anything for cattle to eat or drink. The landscape stretches to the horizon without any … More Living with the Environmental and Social Legacy of U.S. Land Policy in the American West

Of Territorialization and Transplantation: The Contradictions of a Settler Garden in South Africa

Derick Fay, UC Riverside Department of Anthropology § Located in what is now the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, the Haven Hotel is nested within concentric circles of settler demarcation. With changes in South African society, the projects represented by these demarcations have shifted over time. The hotel occupies a space historically designated for white … More Of Territorialization and Transplantation: The Contradictions of a Settler Garden in South Africa

Making Homeland (Haciendo Patria): Agrarian Change, Nationhood and Inter-Ethnic Relations at the Frontier of Colonial Expansion in Chile

By Piergiorgio Di Giminiani, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile § As are many other valleys in the southern Andean region of Chile, Coilaco was the setting of some of the last processes of colonial resettlement that followed the colonization of the indigenous Mapuche region in the late 19th century. Settlers began to migrate to this area soon after … More Making Homeland (Haciendo Patria): Agrarian Change, Nationhood and Inter-Ethnic Relations at the Frontier of Colonial Expansion in Chile

Concrete and Livability in Occupied Palestine

By Kali Rubaii, University of California, Santa Cruz § Portland Cement extracts the enduring time of rocks and mobilizes it to build quickly. Through heat, rock[1] is bound with metals and synthetic chemicals– calcium, silica, aluminum, fly ash, lime. Mixed with water, it becomes concrete and clings to fingers, shovels, jeans. It is rock, transformed into … More Concrete and Livability in Occupied Palestine

Conjuring Property: An Interview with Jeremy Campbell

Conjuring Property: Speculation and Environmental Futures in the Brazilian Amazon By Jeremy Campbell 2015. 256 pp. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press. § Theresa Miller (Postdoctoral Fellow, Smithsonian Institution) spoke with Jeremy Campbell (Associate Professor, Roger Williams University) about his recent book on political economy in formation in the Brazilian Amazon. As an “ethnography of political economy in formation” (p. xiii), … More Conjuring Property: An Interview with Jeremy Campbell