Decolonizing Extinction: An Interview with Juno Salazar Parreñas

Decolonizing Extinction: The Work of Care in Orangutan Rehabilitation By Juno Salazar Parreñas, The Ohio State University 288pp. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. § Colin Hoag spoke with Prof. Juno Salazar Parreñas about her recent book on the orangutan rehabilitation in Malaysia.     For Engagement readers who have not yet read your book, could […]

Read More

This Is Not a Goldmine: Capital, Conservation, and the Politics of Recruitment in the Deep Bismarck Sea

Editorial Note: This post is part of our series highlighting the work of the Anthropology and Environment Society’s 2018 Roy A. Rappaport Prize Finalists. We asked them to outline the argument they made in their submission and to situate their work in relation to the field of environmental anthropology. By Patrick Nason, Columbia University § ABSTRACT: From the […]

Read More

The Meanings and Limits of “Local Water” in Los Angeles

By Sayd Randle, University of Southern California § In the fall of 2014, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti held a press conference in front of the L.A. Department of Water and Power’s (DWP) downtown headquarters to sign his Executive Directive #5, titled “Emergency Drought Response – Creating a Water Wise City.” ED5, as everyone called the […]

Read More

On Contamination: Conservation Science in Devilish Landscapes

By Meredith Root-Bernstein, Institut National de Recherche Agronomique, Grignon, France § When you first see the gold mine in Alhué you are impressed by how massive the cascade of tailings is—by how many endemic trees, shrubs, bird nests, lizards and tarantulas must be crushed underneath it. When I took photos of the hills I always tried […]

Read More

Commentary: The Environmental Anthropology of Settler Colonialism, Part II

*A commentary on Part II of our Engagement thematic series, Life on the Frontier. By Clint Carroll, University of Colorado Boulder § Settler colonial studies offers a set of analytical tools that can help make sense of environmental practices and politics—and their resulting effects on people, other-than-human animals, and landscapes. Understanding the environmental impacts of settler colonialism, […]

Read More

Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

By Paul Berne Burow, Yale University § On May 3, 1933, a common brown buffalo cow gave birth to a snow-white bison calf on the National Bison Range near Moiese, Montana. A ranger noticed it during his morning rounds, and news spread rapidly. A sense of hope swept through communities of the Flathead Nation in western Montana. […]

Read More