Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

Paul Berne Burow, Yale University § On May 3, 1933, a common brown buffalo cow gave birth to a snow-white bison calf on the National Bison Range near Moiese, Montana. A ranger noticed it during his morning rounds, and news spread rapidly. A sense of hope swept through communities of the Flathead Nation in western Montana. … More Wildlife Conservation and Settler Colonialism in the North American West

Of Territorialization and Transplantation: The Contradictions of a Settler Garden in South Africa

Derick Fay, UC Riverside Department of Anthropology § Located in what is now the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, the Haven Hotel is nested within concentric circles of settler demarcation. With changes in South African society, the projects represented by these demarcations have shifted over time. The hotel occupies a space historically designated for white … More Of Territorialization and Transplantation: The Contradictions of a Settler Garden in South Africa

Natural Infrastructures: Sediment, Science, and the Future of Southeast Louisiana

By Monica Patrice Barra, The Graduate Center, City University of New York § Losing a football field an hour Losing land at an average rate of approximately a football field an hour, Louisiana is disintegrating into the sea. Since the 1930s, the state has lost over 2,000 square miles of its coast to the Gulf … More Natural Infrastructures: Sediment, Science, and the Future of Southeast Louisiana

Museums and Ecology: The Story of “Little Frog” (Ranunculus paucifolius)

By Joanna Cobley, University of Canterbury § One botanical specimen collected in the late nineteenth century provides the starting point for this commentary on “museums and ecology.” What can this small endemic buttercup on the verge of extinction that lives on a limestone slope at an altitude of 760 meters tell us about human-environment relationships, preservation … More Museums and Ecology: The Story of “Little Frog” (Ranunculus paucifolius)

Molly Doane’s “Stealing Shining Rivers”: Transnational Conservation Meets a Mexican Forest

ENGAGEMENT Blog editor Micha Rahder recently caught up with Molly Doane to discuss her recent book, Stealing Shining Rivers: Agrarian Conflict, Market Logic, and Conservation in a Mexican Forest (2012, University of Arizona Press), and its broader contributions to debates over communal lands, forest conservation, and neoliberal policies. The book recently won “Best book on … More Molly Doane’s “Stealing Shining Rivers”: Transnational Conservation Meets a Mexican Forest